The 4-step program

When it comes to marketing strategy, any marketing course beyond high school will break it down into four parts: segmenting, targeting, positioning, and the value proposition. Does any of this apply to your water systems business, or is it just academic jargon? I think it applies, and here’s why.

Let’s start with segmenting. My version of this is “a customer is not just any customer”. You probably do this all the time. You know intuitively that the water system needs of an expensive lake home are different from those of farming operations which are still different from those of a municipality.

Segmenting leads to targeting, which is simply identifying which of these segments you feel are the most profitable and make the most sense for your business. As a water systems contractor, you may decide to target everybody that needs water, or just certain segments, such as agriculture.

Once you’ve identified your target market, the strategy moves to positioning. This answers the question, “Where do my products and services fit versus the competition?” Are you the low-cost leader? Are you the expert on variable-speed constant pressure products? Or, is your company somewhat of a generalist, providing a variety of water services?

Finally, after you’ve segmented your potential customers, targeted which ones you’re going after, and decided how you’re going to position your business within that target market comes the value proposition, also sometimes called the unique selling proposition. A couple of fancy names, but this is the meat of a marketing strategy and the essence of your business. It’s also the hardest part. Your value proposition encompasses your advertising, your brand, your competitive advantage, how you do business, and even your logo. It says, “Here’s why you should buy from me.” The list of choices can be long: I am the most convenient (24 hour service); I am the most experienced and reputable; and I am the most affordable, are just a few examples.

The reason the value proposition is so important is that the alternative is to try to be all things to all people. That rarely works because it just confuses the customer. What makes finding the right value proposition difficult is that it has to match the capabilities of your business to what will resonate with your target market. For example, if it doesn’t make financial sense for your business to be the low-cost leader (and it rarely does), you shouldn’t go there.

As a water systems contractor and business owner, you’re probably already going through this exercise, maybe even unconsciously. Nevertheless, you’ll never regret taking a step back from time to time to think the steps through. You just might find a better (and more profitable) value proposition.

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