Your NFL Draft

photo (3)Over the last several weeks, I’ve been training and mentoring a new Field Service Engineer at Franklin Electric. The recruiting process leading up to his hiring was lengthy and tedious at times, taking several months. But especially now, I know we got the right individual.
Finding and hiring the right people is one of the most critical things you will ever do as a manager or business owner. It’s your NFL Draft. The success of your team for years to come will be determined by the decisions you make in this area, and they should take lots of time and thought and discussion.

But after you do hire someone, that’s when the real work begins. In my case, although I had a very capable person who was not new to the role of field service, he was new to our industry, Franklin Electric, our products, our customers, and our products. That is, not new to the game, but new to the team and the league. Over the last few weeks, getting him up to speed on the myriad of things required has taken lots of time and resources. Time and resources that have taken away from other pressing tasks and objectives I could have been working on.

But I maintain there’s no better investment you will ever make than spending as much time as you can with a new employee. It’s a huge opportunity to get him or her started off on the right foot. Squander that opportunity, and you will need to spend all that much more time down the road making corrections.

As a Field Service Engineer at Franklin Electric, there’s a lot to know and we’re just getting started with our newest one in this case. So even though the last few weeks have taken away from other things, I know the team is going to be better for it.

Seize the day

Yvoire_cadran_solaireSometimes with all the marketing and sales advice out there on how to manage and grow your business, it’s easy to forget how important it is to do the simple things right. Yesterday, I ran across this blog post, Carpe Diem, from a professional colleague at Franklin Electric. At first glance, her post  may not seem as if it applies to your water systems contracting business, but read on. The real life lesson here applies just about anywhere, and especially to your business. It makes the point so well, I decided to use it as this week’s Franklin in the Field post. Even when you think things are going well, don’t be the guy who doesn’t call back; someone else will.

Enjoy.

Carpe Diem

Some scary stuff has been happening in my town. Someone has been lying in wait at apartment complexes and attacking residents as they come and go. As part of its reporting on the story, a local news program decided to include a segment on self-defense, including a demonstration of technique. Out of the blue, my brother got a call to lead that demonstration.

My brother is an expert in Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu. He operates a dojo in his hometown, where he offers instruction, hosts seminars, and provides a gathering place for fellow students of the art. He’s still trying to get some traction for his business, as it’s not yet widely recognized in the area. He was thrilled to get the call from the TV station, but he was also pretty surprised.

The filming went off without a hitch, and the segment looked great. (Watch it HERE. Tell me he’s not awesome!)

During the course of the filming, curiosity got the better of my brother. Before the crew left, he asked the reporter why she had selected him over anyone else. Her answer offered an immediate object lesson:

You were the first person to call me back.

No one will argue that hard work and a good product are essential to success. Others would extol the necessity of good marketing, the right price point, and brand building. And I agree wholeheartedly. What I learned in that TV reporter’s answer, however, was the importance of seizing the moment. I have to be ready to jump on opportunity–which means I must also be alert and watchful for any potential.

My brother’s business wouldn’t have suffered if someone else had returned that call first. He would have kept doing what he’s doing, working hard to bring students into his dojo and share his passion. In fact, he’ll keep doing that anyway. Since he did call back, though, he’s certainly better for it. A few more people know about him, he has a terrific video segment to boost his credibility, and his confidence got a shot in the arm.

When opportunity knocks, make sure you’re listening–and then open the door.

Not just solutions, insight

lossless-page1-671px-Two_people_talking_tiffOn several occasions, I’ve emphasized how all of us in the water systems industry are salespeople in one form or another. And as a professional contractor, you are out there week after week selling our industry’s products, services, and expertise. The customer may be a homeowner, a business owner, a farmer, or a municipality. So given the importance of selling in our industry, whenever I see a business article about what makes a successful salesperson, it always gets my interest. In a post last year (Know your stuff), I highlighted a research study done by two PhDs that I thought stated the obvious. They identified eight different sales personalities and concluded the most successful type was what they categorized as “the expert”

I recently ran across a similar study with somewhat different conclusions. In a Harvard Business Review article entitled “The End of Solution Selling”, the authors identify and evaluate not eight, but five sales personality types. There are:

  1. Relationship builders, who take the approach of always being the good guy and focusing on exactly what the customer says he or she wants.
  2. Problem solvers: These sales types dive into a customer’s problems and work diligently to solve those problems.
  3. Hard workers treat sales as a numbers game with a mentality of “if I make more sales calls than anyone else, I will be the most successful”.
  4. A fourth type is the Lone Wolf. As the name implies, these salespeople are very independent and use everything at their disposal, sometimes at the expense of their employer’s policies and procedures.

What was interesting was the fifth type. In their study of 6,000 salespeople, the authors identified this type of sales personality as by far the most successful in today’s business environment. They call this type the Challenger. Challengers are debaters. They have a specific view of what their customer needs are beyond what the customer tells them. They actively share that view with their customer. They don’t simply acquiesce to what the customer is telling them, but instead take the approach of “I’m here to provide you insight and guidance on the issues and problems you don’t know you have”.

The Challenger approach leads to “insight selling” and the big idea of the article is that “solution selling” focuses on the problems that customers tell you they have, whereas “insight selling” focuses on problems customers don’t know they have. It’s important to note that Challengers don’t cross that line of becoming obnoxious. But they are assertive in their opinions of what they believe the customer truly needs.

So, what does any of this have to do with water systems? Even though I’m always dubious of academic articles on the topic of selling, I think the authors are actually confirming what many of us already know. When it comes to water systems, most end-users have no idea what problems they really need solved. Ask a homeowner during a typical service call what their problems are and they will tell you, “I’m out of water, fix it!” The solution selling approach would be to simply get them back in water. However, the Challenger says, “Okay, I will do that, but here’s why you are out of water and here’s what we are going to do to improve your water system.” Maybe the contractor then explains why they need a larger pump, constant pressure, or dry well protection. Once again, the approach is to use expertise and experience to offer insight and guidance.

At the end of the day, you obviously can’t force something on a customer. But you can take control and offer a firm opinion on what you know your customer needs, not just what they are telling you they need. The result will probably be a better, more reliable system for your customer and more sales for you.

The fab five

Even though 2013 is already well underway, I thought we would take one more “over the shoulder” glance back at Franklin in the Field in 2012. There were 51 new posts, and the blog received 6,300 visits from 84 countries. But what’s really interesting is go back and take a look at the five posts that got the most attention (clicks) in 2012.

Coming in at #5 was Every team has an MVP, where I highlighted Franklin Electric’s Charlie Utley on receiving our Most Valuable Player Award at Franklin Electric’s annual sales and training conference.

At #4, We’re not selling pumps was probably my personal favorite. It highlighted how our industry provides so much more than just pumps.

Number 3 was contributed by Franklin’s Tammy Davis. In The real reason she makes a great case for attending that next trade show.

Number 2, Credit where credit is due was posted way back in January and congratulated Keith Hall on his 43 years with Franklin Electric. By the way, Keith is still providing outstanding training at our monthly Franklin Tech sessions in Wilburton, Oklahoma.

Finally, coming in at #1 was 12 AWG, 12 gauge, and #12, a post about wire gauging nomenclature. No, I can’t explain why this one came in at #1 either, but it had 440 views. Apparently there’s a lot more interest in wire sizing that I realized.

There you have it. The five most clicked Franklin in the Field posts from 2012 out of our library of 86. I can’t wait to see what 2013 brings.