If it’s not right, it’s wrong

440x380_acAwhile back, I was attempting to plug my phone charger into a dimly lit wall outlet in a hotel room. I wasn’t having much success, and only when I realized that the outlet had been installed upside down did I understand why. And not only was the outlet installed upside down, but it was also crooked and the screw on the cover plate had been torqued down to the point that the plate was cracked.

In any case, I got my charger plugged in and never gave it a second thought until a couple of weeks later when I spent a couple of long days in a meeting facility. I happened to notice that every single outlet and switch cover screw in the room were perfectly aligned in the vertical, even those close to the floor that you couldn’t really see.

This practice that makes things look a little better has a name in woodworking: it’s called “clocking”. But is it worth the bother in this case? It certainly doesn’t make any difference in the functionality of the product. And my guess is that I’m the only one who has ever sat in that meeting room and taken notice.

So in the scheme of things, is it a big deal? I think it actually is. It tells me that the electrician who installed these outlets took pride in what he was doing. He took that extra half second to get everything as perfect as he could even though the pay was the same. What’s more important is that I can pretty much guarantee you that all the connections and wiring behind that cover are first-rate and done with the same precision. The attention to detail inspired confidence.

When you think about it, that outlet isn’t much different than a wellhead. People can’t see what’s down in the well. They can’t see your splices or pump alignment or whether you’ve used a flow sleeve. They can, however, see what’s at the top. And if what they see at the top looks sloppy, well, they’ve got to wonder about what’s below. On the other hand, if the workmanship above the ground is precise and well-organized, chances are they’ll make the same assumption about the rest.

There are lots of analogies that we can draw from this, but to me it’s another example of what defines a professional versus someone who is just going through the motions. A professional is willing to take the time to get things right. Not just the big stuff, but the details as well.

That first electrical outlet that was upside down with the broken cover? I have no idea what was behind the plate, but it sure didn’t inspire confidence in the integrity of the rest of the product.

3 thoughts on “If it’s not right, it’s wrong

  1. Do you have any blogs that pertain to the pros and cons of hooking up both L1 and L2 through the pressure switch rather than just breaking one of the two legs?

    Thanks,

    Bret Gardner Rock Well Water Systems & Pumps PO Box 326 Chelan, WA 98816 509-687-5253

  2. Mark,

    A couple of comments.

    The Installer Check List that is provided in the AIM manual, is a great tool for contractors to use to not only ensure that the job was done right, but to give the end user a good feeling, knowing the contractor has standards to follow.

    Also, I’ll bet the electrician that installed the outlets with screws aligned just right, has a military back ground of some sort. I still align books, note pads, and pens on the tables at Franklin Tech, using the dress right and align thinking that was stressed during my military career.

    Great blog!

    Regards,
    Keith

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