Do as I say, not as I do

Franklin Electric, along with others, has always promoted the value of periodic check-ups on private water systems. These involve not only having the well water tested once a year, but encouraging homeowners to have their entire system checked on a regular basis. The end goal is to identify issues before they generate an “out of water” service call at the most inconvenient possible time.

That’s good advice, but the reality is that periodic maintenance simply doesn’t happen very often in our industry. That’s always amazed me and I’ve always said that if I were fortunate enough to have my own private water system, it would be very well maintained – It’s a critical system and I wouldn’t leave it to chance. Along these same lines, I’ve been astonished and somewhat dismayed many times on how little homephoto (5)owners know about their water systems.

Fast forward to just a couple of years ago when I was in my own basement changing the air filters in the heating and air conditioning system. Hidden away next to the blower unit is a Little Giant VCMA condensate pump. Today, I can tell you its model number and that it was manufactured in 1998. But until then, I had never taken any notice of it. As a matter of fact, what actually caught my eye was that it looked just like a product that I had just seen at a Franklin P/HVAC seminar.

In that same Franklin seminar, the periodic light maintenance of condensate pumps was emphasized in order to prevent “silly failures” like stuck float switches due to accumulated dirt and dust. So there I was, the proud owner of a Franklin Electric product that I had not only never serviced over the course of five years, but didn’t even realize I owned (Little Giant was acquired by Franklin Electric in 2006).

Granted, my 15 year-old Little Giant condensate pump isn’t quite as critical as a water system. But if it fails, there’s water in the basement and no air conditioning. I was leaving that to chance, just like all those homeowners that never have their water well systems checked.

It’s said that we are all ignorant, but just about different things. As homeowners, I’ve come to believe that’s especially true. And we all ignore simple maintenance, but just on different things.

2 thoughts on “Do as I say, not as I do

  1. Pingback: The devil in the details | Wordsmatter

  2. Wow a year later almost, but nevertheless.
    My name is Kimberly and my husband and I purchased our home about 7 months ago. We had our first day of about 100 degree weather yesterday and used the air conditioner for the first time. At about bed time I heard something start up that I never heard before. My husband and I investigated and found a Little Giant VCMA condensate pump. We had no idea what it was. My husband unplugged it thinking it was malfunctioning, but as I lay there in bed I thought about looking up the info on the top of the unit. I learned a bit of what it was to do and after talking to my husband plugged it back in. At 3 am I awoke and it was still running so I unplugged it once more. Today is another hot day and I am wondering if I need the unit to be on to run the a.c.?. I have looked up the manual to cleaning it but it seems way too much for me to see how to get it out of its place and even clean it. It has really nasty water inside and there is a tube that goes up into the ceiling that contains water all the way up. I am concerned that if I mess with it I will cause damage or not be able to use it after I could get it apart and cleaned. What do you suggest? I am not opposed to having someone come out and maintenance it. Any info. would be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you.

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