Sticker Shock

A couple of weekends ago, I got that unpleasant surprise of no hot water. That’s not nearly as bad as no water, but when you’re looking forward to a hot shower, it’s still a big letdown. After two or so hours of trying to resolve it myself, it was clear that it was time to call in a professional, in this case the company that had installed the product less water heaterthan three years ago. The good news was that everything would still be under warranty.

More good news – right there on the side of my non-working water heater was the installing company’s 24-hour service dispatch number (or so I thought). My call was answered promptly and we set up a service call for the next morning.

There was one minor point of contention: she couldn’t find any record of her company installing the unit. But no problem; as long as I had my paperwork from the installation showing that they had indeed installed it, everything would be covered. I assured her that I did and I even knew exactly where it was filed. She did give me a stern reminder that if it turned out that someone else had installed the product, there would be a significant non-refundable service charge (think Sunday morning) and of course, no warranty coverage.

I never gave it a second thought until later that evening when I grabbed the paperwork out of the file. To my astonishment, the business name on the paperwork didn’t match the company that I had been talking with on the phone! By now, you have probably figured out what happened. Earlier in the year, the plumbing contractor that I’d been on the phone with had been out to repair a broken outside faucet. But while their technician was here, he had slapped his company’s business sticker on the side of my water heater over the sticker of the contractor that had actually installed it. Once I figured this out, I quickly cancelled the one service call and rescheduled with the installing contractor.

Here’s an example where a good business practice was overdone. From both a contractor and consumer perspective, business stickers are great. They’re a convenient and inexpensive way for the homeowner to know who to call if there’s an issue. But this contractor got overzealous with it and almost led me down the wrong path as a result. He ended up coming off as unprofessional. And come to think of it, I better go see whose stickers are on the HVAC unit and water softener. If they belong to him, they’re coming off.

A constant annoyance versus constant pressure

photoA couple of weeks ago, I spent four days hanging around a hunter jumper horse show at one of the largest facilities in the country for these events. Overall, it’s a first-class facility and billed as one of the most beautiful anywhere.

Like any event, there’s always some complaining and over the course of this extended weekend, I heard the usual grumbling from the competitors: “that one judge is biased, the food’s expensive, the events are running behind schedule“, etc. But do you know what the number one complaint was?

“The water pressure here is awful.”

“They’ve got plenty of wash racks but there’s not hardly any water if more than a couple of people are using them”

“It takes forever just to fill a watering bucket.”

It was frustrating to hear, because I knew it didn’t have to be that way. There are numerous pressure boosting products available that could address this or at least make things a lot better. But from what I could tell, a single 6-inch submersible with an undersized pressure tank is supplying the entire facility and all those acres. And beyond the pump house, it’s a hodge-podge of PVC piping that’s been put together over the years as the facility has expanded. Even without knowing all the details of this system, it’s obvious that a few variable-speed or simply single-speed pressure boosting systems would work wonders here. And the cost would be trivial when taken into the overall expenses of managing and maintaining this facility.

Once again, the competition in terms of constant pressure and pressure boosting isn’t necessarily between manufacturers. It’s the alternative of doing nothing. And here’s another case that by doing nothing the owners and management of this otherwise very nice facility constantly keep their customers annoyed.

Next time I’m there, I’m going to track down their maintenance folks and their contractor and get a conversation going. This water system can be better. A lot better.