A constant annoyance versus constant pressure

photoA couple of weeks ago, I spent four days hanging around a hunter jumper horse show at one of the largest facilities in the country for these events. Overall, it’s a first-class facility and billed as one of the most beautiful anywhere.

Like any event, there’s always some complaining and over the course of this extended weekend, I heard the usual grumbling from the competitors: “that one judge is biased, the food’s expensive, the events are running behind schedule“, etc. But do you know what the number one complaint was?

“The water pressure here is awful.”

“They’ve got plenty of wash racks but there’s not hardly any water if more than a couple of people are using them”

“It takes forever just to fill a watering bucket.”

It was frustrating to hear, because I knew it didn’t have to be that way. There are numerous pressure boosting products available that could address this or at least make things a lot better. But from what I could tell, a single 6-inch submersible with an undersized pressure tank is supplying the entire facility and all those acres. And beyond the pump house, it’s a hodge-podge of PVC piping that’s been put together over the years as the facility has expanded. Even without knowing all the details of this system, it’s obvious that a few variable-speed or simply single-speed pressure boosting systems would work wonders here. And the cost would be trivial when taken into the overall expenses of managing and maintaining this facility.

Once again, the competition in terms of constant pressure and pressure boosting isn’t necessarily between manufacturers. It’s the alternative of doing nothing. And here’s another case that by doing nothing the owners and management of this otherwise very nice facility constantly keep their customers annoyed.

Next time I’m there, I’m going to track down their maintenance folks and their contractor and get a conversation going. This water system can be better. A lot better.

“How did we live without ________?”

Wouldn’t it be cool if someone made a washing machine and dryer that was one unit? A single appliance with a single door that you put your dirty laundry into and when the cycle was complete, the clothes were clean AND dry. I read recently that the appliance companies have been looking at this for years and in the not too distant future, an integrated washer and dryer may be a reality. Whenever that happens and we all have those, we may look back and think about how ridiculous it was to have to move a pile of wet laundry froFrigidaire-Affinity-Laund08-lgm the washing machine to the dryer. But until then, we just accept the way things are and never give it a second thought.

Looking in the other direction, there are tons of examples already in our lives today. Who knew we needed smart phones, microwave ovens, or cruise control on our cars? But in every case, up until we had those products, we didn’t know the difference.

What about our industry? I would suggest that variable-speed, constant pressure systems fall squarely into this category. I know this because if you ask a homeowner that has upgraded to constant pressure, they will tell you that they will never go back to a conventional system. But for them to get there, their water systems contractor had to lead them there. Not a single one of those homeowners woke up in the middle of the night thinking, “Boy, I wish someone made a water system that got rid of that large tank and gave me better, more consistent pressure.” They just assumed that for all the advantages of being on a private water system, these were just things they had to live with. They didn’t know there was a better way until they got to experience it for themselves.

Not everyone has a smartphone and likewise, you won’t sell an upgraded, constant pressure system to all of your customers. But to those customers that you do, they won’t be able to imagine going back to their old system ever again.

In the meantime, I think it’s time to go move my laundry from the washer to the dryer.

It pays to pay attention

One of our Hotline Engineers at Franklin Electric came very close to being on the receiving end of this accident earlier this week. The driver of this vehicle pulled into her parking spot too quickly and hit the curb hard enough to jump it. At that point, the driver panicked, hitting the accelerator instead of the brake, and resulting mayhem ensued. Thankfully, this wasn’t a serious accident and no one was hurt.

Right up until the moment of impact, my colleague was enjoying lunch at a table directly on the other side of that window. He could have been hurt, or at the very least covered in glass, but he was long gone by the time the car came through the window. That’s because he saw the whole thing unfold from the beginning, anticipated what might happen, and was already out of the way when the car arrived.

467551_4957447183034_91358143_oReflecting on it later he said, “You know, ever since I can remember, I’ve always been really aware of my surroundings and what was going on around me. That made a difference here.”

There’s a repeated point to be made about safety here. Safety has lots of components – proper equipment and training and good habits to name a few. But all the training and equipment in the world is no substitute for simply paying attention to what’s going on around us. Are there power lines overhead? Is the power really locked out? Who’s in the area? How tall is that overpass? Will it clear my rig? Is that the neighbor’s kid coming to check out my rig while it’s running?

Paying attention is hard to teach but you never know when it will pay huge dividends. Just ask my colleague.

No stone unturned

photoI’ve talked about differentiating your business before (Why you?) – that is, how does your business stand out from your competition and deliver a higher level of product and service?  Here’s another simple, but great example of a business doing exactly that.

The pizza business is very competitive. Just think of the number of pizza restaurants in your neighborhood. And although some might argue, pizza is pizza. So, how does one pizza business differentiate itself from all the others in such a commoditized market?

Enter this pizza restaurant (EOC stands for East of Chicago) located in an area that, as you may have guessed, is heavily agricultural. The last few weeks have been planting season, which mean long days in the fields for the farmers and their crews. Those guys get hungry, but don’t have time to go into town for lunch or dinner.

This pizza business has identified that unmet need and offered a solution. By offering “delivery to your tractor”, they’ve not only differentiated themselves, but expanded their customer base. If the sign simply said “WE DELIVER”, it probably never would have occurred to these customers that they could have fresh pizza for lunch, instead of the usual alternative of brown-bagging it.

Think of this example in terms of your water systems business. Are there opportunities and ways of reaching customers right under your nose that you haven’t thought of?

By the way, do you know what the other side of that sign says? “WE ALSO DELIVER TO THE BALLPARK”.

Ten things I wish the public knew: the final four

IMG_1599We’ve finally arrived at the third and final installment of my short series on the Ten things I wish the public knew about our industry. The last two posts covered one through six (Ten things #1,  Ten things #2). So current sporting activities notwithstanding, here are my final four:

7. Most well owners love their water systems.

Ask most private water systems owners what they think of their well water and they will tell you “I love it!” They like the taste, especially as opposed to chemically-treated public water, they like being in control of their water system, and they like the feeling of not being tied to the whims (and invoices) of a water authority. To many, a private water system symbolizes independence and self-sufficiency–and good, clean water.

8. That bottle of spring water you’re drinking? … It’s well water.

You know those bottles of water you buy at the store  labeled natural spring water? That label makes for good marketing, but the truth is that is spring water is simply groundwater, and there’s a good chance that water came from a well. Private well owners get all the natural spring water they want virtually for free–straight from their well. Of course, labeling a bottle well water just wouldn’t have the same ring to it.

9. Even where groundwater isn’t perfect, we can usually fix it.

In certain regions, the groundwater may naturally contain high amounts of iron, sulfur, or other minerals, making it less appealing for drinking and household use. In these cases, there are plenty of safe, effective, affordable technologies out there to address and remove these components, leaving the homeowner with a high quality source of water. These technologies don’t have to involve chemicals, either (e.g. reverse osmosis, filtering systems, etc.).

10. Well water makes environmental sense.

One might believe that having a common water infrastructure in the form of public water would be a more efficient delivery system than lots of private water wells. The fact is that it’s not, and there are two big reasons. First, it takes a lot of energy to move water through all those miles of pipes–pipelines that in many cases don’t exist today. Second, pipes have lots of leaks. It’s estimated that literally millions of gallons of water are wasted each year due to the aging infrastructure of public water. Pumping groundwater right from a well at the source is far more efficient and, well, greener.

There you have it. It may evolve or expand over time, but that’s my current list of the ten things I wish the public knew and understood about groundwater and our industry. I’d love to hear your commentary.

Read all about it!

800px-Sedona_Red_Rock_News

I’ve talked in past posts about the importance of being involved in your community as part of building good relationships with your customer base. Here’s a tip related to this that I heard years ago but was recently reminded of again.

A friend of mine sells manufacturing equipment over a large, multi-state area. Given the size of his territory, he can only see most of his customers once a month.

Many of his customer visits are in smaller, out-of-the-way towns. He normally arrives the night before the customer meeting, but before going to the hotel, he makes it a point to pick up a copy of the local newspaper to read. As a result, he’s more engaged and informed the next day about what’s going on in the community than he would be otherwise. He says it just makes conversations go better, especially those in informal meetings over breakfast and lunch. As an alternative, he sometimes catches the local TV news, but he maintains there’s nothing better than the local newspaper to get him up-to-date. And besides, he says those papers are often more interesting than the ubiquitous USA Today.

It’s a small thing and the trade area of your water systems business probably doesn’t cover multiple states. But the point remains – most of us like to do business with people that are part of our community. For you, that may mean coaching Little League or serving in a volunteer organization or even being involved local politics. Whatever the venue, being engaged with your customers also means being involved with what’s going on in your community.

Giving thanks

It’s that time of year, so though it may seem a little trite, I’m writing a thankful post. You see, I’ve learned a lot since I started this blog. I’ve learned how helpful it can be to make connections by sharing the things that I’ve seen and learned  in my water systems profession. But I’ve also learned how hard it can be to put those things into words and share them in a way that makes sense. I’ve learned how important it is to maintain a regular schedule, to be here when I say I will. Most of all, once again I’ve learned what a great industry we have and how much I enjoy being part of it.

I relish hearing your feedback and exchanging ideas. It makes me proud to be part of something as fundamental as providing good, clean water to people who need it–which, by the way, is pretty much everyone. And frankly, the best part of this industry is the people. I love the people who cross my path. They–YOU–teach me things every day.

So to all of you, the readers who follow this blog, I offer a hearty thank you. You hold me accountable; you keep me engaged. You remind me why I’m here in the first place.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Now, whom do YOU need to thank?